Struggling in your new job? Six reasons why you shouldn’t give up yet

13 Sep, 2021

Three months into a new job, and the regret of leaving your previous position is starting to hit hard. The promises made in your interviews haven’t been delivered, you don’t feel motivated, included or engaged and you’re even struggling with the work. You quickly realise the devil you knew was far greater than the one you’re facing now, and you don’t know what to do next.

You may think the simple solution is to pack your bags and give up now. But, this may not be your best option.

In this blog, we share six reasons why you shouldn’t give up your new job immediately even if you’re struggling.

Logic trumps emotion

We’ve all had those days at work where the two words “I quit” dance on the tip of our tongues. This feeling, particularly in a new job, can easily tip over the edge and take control. While this is an intrinsically human response, it’s often not the best way to make an important career decision.

In these situations, it’s best to add logic into the decision-making mix. Ask yourself, What’s the best long-term decision for myself and the people I care about? Take your time to answer this question, sleep on it, decompress, and try to incorporate logic and rationale into your decision. Swallow the urge to quit right away and give yourself the opportunity to uncover the right solution for you. Then, whether you then decide to stay or leave, you’ll know you’ve made the best decision possible for yourself.

Employment has advantages

Irrespective of how you feel about your new job, it’s important to remember that employment has some advantages. Firstly, you’ll have money coming in to maintain your lifestyle. Secondly, it’s easier to network with professional contacts when their perception is that you’re not just looking for a job (even though you might be). Thirdly and finally, looking for a new job is much harder when unemployed because the burden of rising bills can soon force you into a desperate and more dire situation. This doesn’t mean you are trapped; it simply means that being employed is usually better than being unemployed until you have a concrete career plan.

You don’t have a career plan

If there is one thing your recent move has demonstrated, it’s that the grass isn’t always greener on the other side. If you hastily move again, chances are you’ll likely end up in a similar or worse position. All career moves strike an unpredictable balance between risk and reward. That’s why, to attain the rewards you seek, it’s important you have a plan in place. Consider you’re end goal, what you need to get there, and who can help you reach it. Do you due diligence and spend time putting together this career plan, or risk repeating history when you decide it’s time to move again.

The job may not be the problem

If you’re career is starting to resemble somewhat of a pinball machine, chances are the problem may be more dispositional than situational, meaning it might be time to look inwards. Particularly in recent times, the pressures on our mental health and physical wellbeing have heightened. This means the issues you’re experiencing in your current or previous job may in-fact not even be job-related. As such, giving up and moving on won’t remedy this situation. We recommend you check-in on yourself to identify the root of your problems, and find additional support mechanisms elsewhere if you need them (family, friends, professional support, etc.).  If you discover that the job is not the actual problem, then the situation might be salvageable.

The situation is salvageable

If the situation is salvageable, then packing your bags is probably premature. After all, you’ve joined this company for a reason, and there may still be an opportunity to reap the benefits you were originally promised. Good things take time, and by sticking with it you give yourself an opportunity to turn things around. First, Identify the issues you’ve experienced and bring them up with the right people in your new organisation. Propose a solution and work cohesively with these people to address them. In a new job this can feel daunting, but if your only other option is to give up, what do you have to lose? As you spend more time with new people, and overcome these challenges together, your relationships will solidify, and your overall work experience may improve.

Job hopping impacts reputation

Moving jobs should not be discouraged if you’re leaving a bad environment or reaching for a better one. However, it’s important to consider the impact that continuous job hopping can have on your professional reputation. You may have valid reasons for each move, but in the eyes of a new employer, bulk movements can suggest a lack of loyalty, adaptability and even ability. Put it this way, an employer is less likely to bring someone onboard if history tells them they’ll only jump ship soon after.

If you’re getting towards this point, it could be worth enduring some short-term pain to maximise your long-term prospects. This may entail sticking around for a certain period of time, learning key lessons along the way, until you can showcase to a prospective employer the ideal qualities and attributes they look for in a new recruit.

New jobs can be intimidating, especially when they don’t live up to your initial expectations. In these situations, sometimes there is merit in sticking at it rather than giving up right away. Working in the right environment is crucial for your wellbeing and success, so, consider the above before you decide to make another move.

However, if you’ve hit the point of no return in your new job, our specialist recruitment consultants at Ignite are here to help. We are passionate about people, and ensuring we facilitate the best employer connections to optimise your work experience is of upmost importance to us. We’re here to help you find your dream job and work environment so you don’t struggle in the first place.